Browsing articles in "reflexology"
Aug 10, 2014
Nancy Upton

Reflexology and Dogs: Royal Flush Havanese Offers Tips on Keeping Your …


Reflexology and Dogs: Royal Flush Havanese Offers Tips on Keeping Your Canine Content

PRWEB.COM Newswire

PRWEB.COM NewswireCharlestown, RI (PRWEB) August 05, 2014

When a dog becomes injured, there are usually several different treatment options available. One viable option for canines that has recently garnered attention is reflexology, otherwise known as acupressure. Reflexology is very similar to acupuncture, except instead of needles, finger and hand pressure are used. This holistic technique can also be used to improve an uninjured canine’s balance, relaxation, and circulation. Acupressure works by applying repetitive pressure over a reflex point in order to increase circulation in that area. For injured pets, applying firm and unchanging pressure on a reflex point will reduce circulation and feeling at that spot, reducing pain and soreness. Reflexology can also work to increase strength and healing, increase the speed of immune response, control vomiting, and manage chronic pain.

The most commonly worked reflexology point on canines is the paw. Reflexology in this area can help relieve soreness and stiffness from everyday wear and tear on the pads of the feet– almost like a foot massage. To begin, sit down next to the dog, at a time when he/she is relaxed. Gently pick up one paw, and use a finger or thumb to firmly apply repetitive pressure onto the paw. Work over each pad of the foot, and end by gently massaging between each of the pads. Some dogs may also enjoy having the bottom of their legs massaged, similar to the ankles of a human.

Other key areas include the stomach, the bladder, and a spot known as GB 20. To provide acupressure for the stomach, look for a spot below the knee of the canine, outside the edge of the tibia. Massaging this area will increase general energy, relieve arthritis, increase circulation for the lower legs, and can also help with digestion. The bladder is the best spot to help with the lower back, hips, and hind end. This is located within the canine’s Popliteal Fossa, behind the knee on the back of the rear leg. Working this area can also help to reduce pain, stiffness, and constipation. GB 20 is located underneath the occipital bone, within the ‘dimples’ at the base of the skull. Massaging this area will balance out nervousness and irritability, as well as seizures and sinus infections.

Although these are just a sampling of reflex points, reflexology methods can be applied almost anywhere on a canine’s body, to help heal almost any ailment. Lucky Dog Health has a detailed chart (found here) outlining major acupressure points for dogs and how to alleviate symptoms ranging from bronchitis, eye discomfort, kidney weakness, and digestive problems.

Before attempting to perform reflexology on a dog, all owners should make sure they research how to perform acupressure on that specific area. Videos found online can be extremely helpful, and several online courses are available as well. If a dog appears to be in pain, stop the reflexology on that reflex point immediately. Royal Flush Havanese recommends that all injured dogs be checked by a veterinarian before attempting to perform any treatment.

Discover useful dog-care tips and advice at the Royal Flush Havanese website today. Awarded a Certificate of No Complaints and rated A+ for their outstanding dedication to honesty in the business place, customer satisfaction and ethical policies and procedures by the Better Business Bureau, Royal Flush Havanese is dedicated to producing the finest Havanese puppies for sale and providing outstanding service in canine care. Royal Flush Havanese is the only dog breeder in the Ocean State to be accredited by the BBB and continually receives great reviews from their many happy clients. Royal Flush Havanese boasts thousands of admiring fans and followers on Facebook as well. Their commitment, passion, and love for the Havanese breed is applauded by fellow Havanese lovers all over Rhode Island, Florida, and the United States.

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/royalflushhavanesereviews/puppiesforsalereflexology/prweb12045093.htm

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Aug 9, 2014
Nancy Upton

Reflexology and Dogs: Royal Flush Havanese Offers Tips on Keeping Your … – Virtual

Royal Flush Havanese shares with readers the unique benefits that reflexology offers.

Charlestown, RI (PRWEB) August 05, 2014

When a dog becomes injured, there are usually several different treatment options available. One viable option for canines that has recently garnered attention is reflexology, otherwise known as acupressure. Reflexology is very similar to acupuncture, except instead of needles, finger and hand pressure are used. This holistic technique can also be used to improve an uninjured canine’s balance, relaxation, and circulation. Acupressure works by applying repetitive pressure over a reflex point in order to increase circulation in that area. For injured pets, applying firm and unchanging pressure on a reflex point will reduce circulation and feeling at that spot, reducing pain and soreness. Reflexology can also work to increase strength and healing, increase the speed of immune response, control vomiting, and manage chronic pain.

The most commonly worked reflexology point on canines is the paw. Reflexology in this area can help relieve soreness and stiffness from everyday wear and tear on the pads of the feet– almost like a foot massage. To begin, sit down next to the dog, at a time when he/she is relaxed. Gently pick up one paw, and use a finger or thumb to firmly apply repetitive pressure onto the paw. Work over each pad of the foot, and end by gently massaging between each of the pads. Some dogs may also enjoy having the bottom of their legs massaged, similar to the ankles of a human.

Other key areas include the stomach, the bladder, and a spot known as GB 20. To provide acupressure for the stomach, look for a spot below the knee of the canine, outside the edge of the tibia. Massaging this area will increase general energy, relieve arthritis, increase circulation for the lower legs, and can also help with digestion. The bladder is the best spot to help with the lower back, hips, and hind end. This is located within the canine’s Popliteal Fossa, behind the knee on the back of the rear leg. Working this area can also help to reduce pain, stiffness, and constipation. GB 20 is located underneath the occipital bone, within the ‘dimples’ at the base of the skull. Massaging this area will balance out nervousness and irritability, as well as seizures and sinus infections.

Although these are just a sampling of reflex points, reflexology methods can be applied almost anywhere on a canine’s body, to help heal almost any ailment. Lucky Dog Health has a detailed chart (found here) outlining major acupressure points for dogs and how to alleviate symptoms ranging from bronchitis, eye discomfort, kidney weakness, and digestive problems.

Before attempting to perform reflexology on a dog, all owners should make sure they research how to perform acupressure on that specific area. Videos found online can be extremely helpful, and several online courses are available as well. If a dog appears to be in pain, stop the reflexology on that reflex point immediately. Royal Flush Havanese recommends that all injured dogs be checked by a veterinarian before attempting to perform any treatment.

Discover useful dog-care tips and advice at the Royal Flush Havanese website today. Awarded a Certificate of No Complaints and rated A+ for their outstanding dedication to honesty in the business place, customer satisfaction and ethical policies and procedures by the Better Business Bureau, Royal Flush Havanese is dedicated to producing the finest Havanese puppies for sale and providing outstanding service in canine care. Royal Flush Havanese is the only dog breeder in the Ocean State to be accredited by the BBB and continually receives great reviews from their many happy clients. Royal Flush Havanese boasts thousands of admiring fans and followers on Facebook as well. Their commitment, passion, and love for the Havanese breed is applauded by fellow Havanese lovers all over Rhode Island, Florida, and the United States.

Aug 8, 2014
Nancy Upton

Nicola aims to reduce workplace stress

A new Liverpool-based business is helping to combat the stresses of modern day life with backing from Merseyside Special Investment Fund (MSIF).

Mindfit is a health and wellbeing company which offers a range of complementary therapies to individuals, but specialises in workplace wellbeing by improving the health, mind-set and performance of staff.

The business is the brainchild of Nicola Forshaw, a clinical hypnotherapist and advanced reflexologist who has been practising since 2010 before deciding to set up her new business.

She has brought in an additional five complementary healthcare professionals to support the business, offering a range of therapies such as hypnotherapy, reflexology, counselling, homeopathy, aromatherapy and holistic massage, as well as the ‘getmindfit’ workshop that enhances mental fitness, wellbeing and resilience to stress.

MSIF has provided a £7,500 loan which to secure and fit out premises in Queen Avenue off Dale Street/Castle Street in the city centre.

Nicola said: “We are passionate about using the power of the mind to cultivate improved health and happiness. There has been a sizeable shift in consciousness towards employee wellbeing. Businesses are now fully aware that healthy, happy staff drive long term sustainability.

“Forward thinking companies such as Google, Apple and Astra Zeneca are incorporating mindfulness meditation training into their employee wellbeing programmes, believing that IQ alone doesn’t cut it anymore and staff need to have emotional intelligence and resilience in abundance to succeed in this ever-demanding world. We have had particular interest from law firms, but also want to connect with any businesses who are looking to instil a positive, healthy culture. “

MSIF’s Laura Moss said: “Nicola has done her research and this shows that there is a huge market for complementary therapies. Modern life can be very busy and stressful and I think many people would be receptive to finding a way to balance this.

“Businesses are also much more aware of their corporate social responsibility and investing in the welfare of their staff as they recognise that this also benefits the company.”

Mindfit will be holding an opening event on Thursday August 21, from 4pm–7pm. Details are available at www.mind-fit.co.uk

Aug 7, 2014
Nancy Upton

Slather me up

Everybody has a fantasy about what they’d do if they won the lottery. I’ve always been clear about mine: hire a live-in masseuse. I’d get a minimum of two massages a day of about four hours each. In fact, some days I wouldn’t even get off the table, especially if I could figure out a way to simultaneously get a straw into a glass of chardonnay.

People have very mixed feelings about massage. Some are totally creeped-out by being rubbed with scented oil by total strangers. This is clearly a birth defect and I feel totally sorry for them.

Look for La Jolla resident Inga’s lighthearted looks at life in La Jolla Light. Reach her at inga47@san.rr.com

I have other friends who, like me, absolutely love massage. My preferred masseur, of course, is Olof, who generously rubs my back if we’re watching TV together, racking up husband points like you wouldn’t believe. He insists he needs them in case of a sudden husband point conflagration, which has occurred from time to time, especially when long-awaited plans were cancelled due to business travel. But he’s retired now so it shouldn’t be too hard to maintain a positive balance.

Not surprisingly, my favorite massagee is Olof. Not a fan of “stranger” massage, he is only too happy to have a can of whipped cream slathered over — er, too much information. Anyway, as a single working parent for 12 years, I was financially ineligible for massage unless someone gifted me one. So I’m trying to make up for lost time.

My only hesitation at all about massage is that I feel a little bad that the masseuse is getting stuck with my aged chubby body. Was I the fantasy she had when she went to massage school? I think not.

Of course, we aged chubby people are often the folks with money for massages, which I’m sure doesn’t keep massage people from hoping for some firmer flesh to manipulate. Several years ago I went into a spa to get a massage gift certificate for my very athletic younger son. He’d been there before. The massage girl’s face lit up like a Christmas tree when I mentioned his name. I can assure you that nobody’s face lights up when they hear my name, except possibly to recall that I tip well. Considering my body, maybe it’s not well enough.

My extreme fondness for massage has made my husband wonder aloud if I were adopted from a sensory-deprived Romanian orphanage. As a blue-eyed blond in a family of brown-eyed brunettes, it seemed plausible. Nope, I’m just a massage junkie, plain and simple.

Sometimes it’s nice to do a massage just focusing on one area. I’ve never actually taken heroin (which probably won’t surprise anyone, especially with the easy availability of chardonnay) but I think head massage must be a similar high. Those endorphins just go crazy. I’d probably have my post-lottery live-in masseuse do at least one head and one foot massage a day, too.

Not too long ago, I wandered into an Asian-run massage place whose brochure advertised their treatments as “better for your organ.” I couldn’t argue with such a charming endorsement and signed up for a reflexology foot massage. All our organs are alleged to have nerve endings in the foot so that pressing on certain areas can help diagnose problems elsewhere in the body. Of those 7,000 nerve endings, 6,000 of mine seem to be perennially annoyed. The foot masseur pressed on one place that was excruciating painful. I flinched. “Hurt there, kidney no good,” he said. No good? Maybe they were just having a bad day? I mean, we’re talking kidneys here.

Noting a really sore spot during a foot massage at another place last year, I asked, “what organ is that?” The masseuse said “sinuses.” Geesh, that’s probably one of the three organs in my whole body that has consistently behaved! So as a diagnostic tool, it may not work that well for me. I’m thinking that in my case, maybe the pain in my feet might mean “need new shoes” or “lose weight, Lumpy!” Don’t really care. It just feels heavenly.

I guess if you’re going to have an addiction, massage isn’t the worse one you can have. But I really have to start buying lottery tickets. u

Look for La Jolla resident Inga’s lighthearted looks at life in La Jolla Light. Reach her at inga47@san.rr.com

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Aug 6, 2014
Nancy Upton

A Complication of Paralysis

When people consider what life would be like should they lose the ability to move their limbs, I don’t thing most people think beyond the paralysis. There is no question that life would never be the same, but could anyone ever anticipate some of the other unusual issues that might result?

Michelle Collins, 2013 graduate of the Academy’s Therapeutic Hand Foot Reflexology Certification, recently completed a research study with a young man, quadriplegic since 2002, who, four years ago, suddenly developed abnormal retention of urine.

We invite you to examine this well executed and documented study of the effects of reflexology on Uroschesis.

Aug 5, 2014
Nancy Upton

Danforth herbal store finds there’s no cure for rising rent

The business was founded by her grandfather, Max Harriman Thuna, in Austria, in 1888. Thuna, an osteopath, immigrated first to New York and set up a practice specializing in social diseases.

Aug 4, 2014
Nancy Upton

How to choose the right health plan

There are practical ways to compare the various mediclaim policies available in the market

Very often, affordability is the sole factor taken into consideration when one is deciding on a health insurance plan. But it would be more prudent to instead look out for the plans that are the most suitable for us. Here are ways to choose an appropriate health policy.

Right sum insured

First and foremost, it is important to be able to determine a sufficient sum insured to cover your needs or that of your family in case of a family floater policy. Age is an important consideration in this regard. In particular, remember that the senior age group requires higher protection.

Also keep in mind that the healthcare costs differ across cities, so this should be factored into your calculation.

If your employer provides a health cover, it’s important to evaluate if this is sufficient and comprehensive or whether an additional plan is required over and above this. It is also imperative take into account some other key aspects like exposure to high levels of stress and lifestyle-related diseases when deciding on the right amount of sum insured. Network hospitals are a group of hospitals that are enlisted with the insurance company or a TPA (Third Party Administrator). The main benefit offered by a network hospital under an insurance policy is the cashless facility that lets you get admitted and treated without incurring any cost, thereby reducing your financial burden in case of a medical emergency. The network hospitals generally have negotiated prices for specific surgical procedures; consequently, the overall cost of hospitalisation may also reduce. It is advisable to opt for a health plan that has a higher number of network hospitals in your city or town.

Different plans will have specific limits on the benefits that can be claimed. These can vary from a limit on your hospital room charges and sum insured limits for specific diseases or limits on amounts payable toward doctor charges. An insurance plan with a sub-limit will impact your out-of-pocket expenses, as you will have to bear expenses not covered by the plan. It is advisable to opt for a plan with no sub-limits.

Most health insurance companies have a ‘waiting period’ when it comes to pre-existing diseases, i.e. any disease which the policy holder may have prior to buying the policy. This waiting period varies between 1-4 years across different plans available in the market. In addition to pre-existing diseases, some other standard ailments also have a one or two-year waiting period before the cover comes into effect, such as cataract, a hernia, etc. The common categories of standard exclusions include cosmetic surgery, suicide, HIV/AIDS, alternative therapies like acupressure and reflexology, etc.

Effectively, the lower the waiting period and exclusions, the more comprehensive the coverage.

Other benefits

While health insurance is primarily looked at for protection, you can look for plans that offer regular preventive check-ups, run personalised programmes to help you manage and improve your health and reward you for staying healthy.

Also check for plans that have a restoration facility. This becomes advantageous to the policyholder in cases where multiple medical emergencies or hospital stays that are not related to each other occur in the same policy year. This is an important feature and helps in getting additional coverage.

Besides this, it is important to take into consideration some of the other benefits, such as a maternity cover or a worldwide cover in case you travel frequently, or an outpatient cover, depending on the need.

Finally, if you want to reduce costs, there are a number of plans in the market today that provide the option to bring down premiums by opting to share a part of the claim cost. One needs to look out for plans that provide a deductible or co-payment option in case the cost is a constraint or there is already an insufficient existing plan which one would like to top up.

The writer is Managing Director and CEO, Cigna TTK Health Insurance

Aug 3, 2014
Nancy Upton

LTC names Lor as Student Ambassador

LTC names Lor as Student Ambassador

Velyi Lor, from Sheboygan, was recently selected to receive one of the highest honors Lakeshore Technical College gives a student by naming her Student Ambassador for the 2014-15 school year.

As ambassador, Lor will work to promote LTC’s campus and community, along with Wisconsin Technical College System events. Also, as part of her responsibilities, Lor will represent LTC at the state Ambassador Conference this April in Madison.

The Student Ambassador program is a statewide program of the Wisconsin Technical College System. One student from each of the state’s 16 technical colleges is selected for the honor based on high academic achievement, community involvement, leadership and a commitment to higher education.

LTC offers new seminar

Lakeshore Technical College is offering a new seminar on ear reflexology, a relaxation technique, from 8 a.m. to noon Wednesday, Aug. 13, at the LTC Cleveland campus.

The cost of the seminar is $110 and the class number is 41970. To register by phone with credit card, call 1-888-GO TO LTC (1-888-468-6582) Ext. 1366. For questions or detailed information, visit www.gotoltc.edu/seminars or call Ruth at 920-693-1167, or e-mail at ruth.semph@gotoltc.edu.

Lakeland names new exercise science, Spanish faculty

Lakeland College has added two full-time faculty for the 2014-15 academic year. William Ebben has been named associate professor of exercise science and sport studies. Juli Cáceres García has been named assistant professor of Spanish.

Ebben has been teaching and coaching for nearly 20 years, and has a strong record of motivating students to succeed. He comes to Lakeland from the University of Wisconsin-Parkside, where he had been an associate professor in the Department of Health, Exercise Science and Sports Management since 2010.

Cáceres García comes to Lakeland from the University of Minnesota-Duluth, where he had been an assistant professor of foreign languages and literature since 2008.

His own research interests include the Spanish language; modern and contemporary peninsular and Latin American film, literature and popular culture; and feminist and gender/queer studies.

Shirmer named to dean’s list

Janelle Schirmer, a 2011 Plymouth High School graduate and junior at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, was named to the dean’s list for the spring semester. She is majoring in human biology with emphases in nutritional and exercise sciences.

LTC named to national list for top online colleges

Lakeshore Technical College has been named among the nation’s top 100 online colleges for the 2014 academic year by BestColleges.com.

LTC was 35th on the two-year college list and one of three from Wisconsin. Wisconsin Indianhead Technical College was 39th and Moraine Park Technical College was 46th.

Aug 2, 2014
Nancy Upton

Leave tension at the door at Seapoint Massage

DOVER — The Dover Chamber was pleased to welcome Seapoint Massage Wellness with a traditional ribbon cutting ceremony.

Nestled inside the Old Strafford County Courthouse in downtown Dover, Seapoint Massage Wellness is owned and operated by Jaclyn Scott-Kay, LMT, who has 16 years of experience as a licensed massage therapist in New Hampshire. Seapoint Massage Wellness offers therapeutic massage, shirodhara, reflexology, reiki and aromatherapy to achieve overall wellness.

Scott-Kay’s passion is to help people understand and listen to their own bodies so they can learn to maintain a level of peace in their busy lives.

Seapoint Massage Wellness has a wonderful ambience, replete with comfort and hospitality that will help leave your tension at the door. Come let the serenity and aromas take you away from your daily routine and stressful life.

Seapoint Massage Wellness is located at 10 Second Street, Suite E in Dover. Their hours of operation are Tuesday-Thursday, 10:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m. and Friday-Sunday 10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. For more information about Seapoint Massage Wellness, visit www.seapointmassage.com or call (603)-617-2555. Jaclyn Scott Kay can also be reached via email at info@seapointmassage.com.

The Greater Dover Chamber of Commerce is a not-for-profit association of businesses, professionals, individuals, and organizations working together to advance the economic well-being of its members and the community. For details on Dover Chamber membership and other programs or for a schedule of activities, please call the Greater Dover Chamber of Commerce at 603-742-2218, e-mail info@dovernh.org, or visit www.dovernh.org.

Aug 1, 2014
Nancy Upton

Professional building aura as calm as its surroundings

On the corner of Wilcox Road in Stonington, with views of Quiambaug Cove to one side and horses grazing around the front yard of a farm on the other, the Quiambaug Cove Professional Center has attracted a certain kind of business to its office and studio spaces. From yoga to hypnotherapy, reiki and reflexology, the center is home to a variety of holistic health and alternative healing practices.

Businesses in the building include Reflexology by Katie, Yoga by The Sea, Healing Thru Touch, River Light Wellness Center, Stonington Natural Health Center, and physical therapy, counseling, law and other businesses.

Jane Percy, owner of River Light Wellness Center, was one of the first wellness businesses to move into the building when it was purchased from a utilities company and turned into office space in the early 2000s. She said there was something about the space that felt like an ideal home for her business.

“There was already a sense that in this building that – while there may be business people, while there may be other enterprises – there is kind of a core group of people who pay attention to health and well being and assisting others, and that’s really different from one lone person being in a commercial building,” said Percy. “There’s something very nice about this spot.”

Other business owners agree that the building has the right feeling for a health and wellness business.

“It’s really hard to find office space that you feel comfortable in as a therapist,” said Katie Carpionato, who has been practicing reflexology – form of alternative medicine based on applying pressure to different areas of the body – with her business, Reflexology by Katie, at Quiambaug Cove for just over a year.

“I just got a really good vibe from it and then I saw these different (businesses) and thought this might really be a good spot for me. It sounds funny ‘oh, you get a really good vibe,’ but you do,” she said.

Many of the businesses were also drawn to the space by some of its more practical features, like ample parking, an easy-to-find location on Route 1, substantial outdoor space and a quiet atmosphere, which owners say can be hard to find in downtown storefronts and strip malls.

“There’s something quiet about the space. There’s good insulation, we don’t hear each other,” said Percy, who said that a quiet, private space is key for both business owners and their clients to feel at ease. “If its not a comfortable place for me, then I can’t do my work comfortably. And that is true of everybody.”

In addition to good vibes, business owners also credit supportive and like-minded neighbors with their own business’s success at the Quiambaug Cove location. Many have had locations in other office buildings and business parks, but agree that there is an added level of acceptance in having neighbors who are also in the holistic health community. Business owners are on a first name basis with each other, and say they feel more comfortable in a less business-focused office building.

Chris DeWick, owner of the Healing Thru Touch and practitioner of reiki – a Buddhist healing practice that makes use of the body’s energy fields – said she felt comfortable in the building and with the neighboring businesses from the start.

“It’s a beautiful energy in that building. It’s calm and peace(ful),” said DeWick, who agreed the location helped to create the peace, “but more so … the people that work there. Everybody is of a like mind. We’re all there to help people. Nobody really has an ego and if they do they leave it at the door before they walk into the building. We’re all pretty good friends.”

Along with acceptance, having neighbors in a similar field can bring a boost to business said Carpionato, whose reflexology studio is next door to Jane Percy at River Light Wellness.

“It creates a community, a small business health community. I know that when I have clients who come in … I refer (my neighbors),” said Cariponato. “They’re close by – they’re next door or down the hallway. It’s easy and accessible.”

With owners who can refer customers to neighboring businesses, Percy said the business relationships in the building are more collaborative than competitive, despite some overlapping service offerings.

“In all the years that I’ve been here – it’s more than 10 now – I don’t think there’s ever been a moment of feeling like there was competitiveness,” said Percy. “… The approach is much more collaborative.”

J.HOPPER@THEDAY.COM

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