Browsing articles in "reflexology"
Apr 9, 2014
Nancy Upton

Man who loves feet is creeping out dozens of Arizona real estate agents

There is a man in the greater Phoenix, Arizona area who is targeting female real estate agents with questions about their feet. These female real estate agents are not happy about it, but as KPHO CBS 5 AZ reports, there isn’t much they can do about it other than warn each other.

(KPHO)

KPHO spoke with DPR Realty agent Hope Salas. Ms. Salas says she was contacted by a prospective home buyer via text. The man, who identified himself as Anthony, said he had just moved to Arizona from New York four months ago, and that he worked in reflexology. Reflexology, though it does have itsupporters, is an alternative form of medicine that appears to be little more than, “a form of foot massage,” according to Quackwatch.

(KPHO)

“Anthony” quickly steered the conversation away from homes and started talking feet, asking Ms. Salas if she wore heels often. Another realtor, Lacey Washburn of Realty One Group, told KPHO about her interaction with the foot fetishist, saying, “He asked me if I ever had reflexology done before, which I didn’t answer that question. And then he asked me if I liked having foot massages or foot rubs, which I didn’t answer that question either.”

(KPHO)

KPHO reports that a “number of realtors” have reported the man to police, but because “Anthony” hasn’t actually broken any laws, there isn’t much that can be done. In the meantime, agents are warning each other via their Facebook group and are staying on high alert. The station tried speaking with the man, but only got his voicemail.

More info: KPHO

Apr 8, 2014
Nancy Upton

Reflexology clinic planned for Downham Market

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  • Apr 7, 2014
    Nancy Upton

    Reflexology clinic plan for Downham Market

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  • Apr 6, 2014
    Nancy Upton

    Waterville’s Women’s Wellness event promotes healthy living

    1:00 AM

    Hundreds attend the 17th annual gathering where women can find reliable medical information.

    By Jesse Scardina jscardina@centralmaine.com
    Staff Writer

    WATERVILLE — One by one, Ellen Thorne dumped 11 teaspoons of sugar into a small empty apple juice container, the mound of sugar at the bottom representing how much was in one serving of what’s typically considered a healthy beverage.

    Women watch and participate in an elastic band exercise demonstration Saturday at the 17th annual World of Women’s Wellness, sponsored by Inland Hospital at Thomas College.

    Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel

    Vicki Goodwin, left, a registered nurse at Inland Hospital, checks the blood pressure of Connie Finley on Saturday.

    Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel

    Thorne, 21, a University of Maine at Farmington student, and fellow volunteer and UMF student Jenna Williams described the reaction Saturday at Thomas College from people watching the demonstration, especially parents, when they saw the amount of sugar in the soft drinks and juices spread out on the table.

    “It’s important to have that interaction between age groups on these health issues,” said Williams, 21. “Just by seeing it like this really shows them the problem.”

    The demonstration by the two nutrition students was one of dozens at the 17th annual Inland Hospital World of Women’s Wellness event, a daylong affair that promotes healthy living and medical advice to hundreds of women each year. About 500 people attended, officials said.

    “It’s a place where women can get together under one roof and find local resources and good and reliable health information,” said Sara Dyer, Inland’s director of community relations.

    Dozens of community organizations donated time and resources, including eye screenings from Kennebec Eye Care and Walmart; healthful eating and lifestyle information from Hannaford Bros., Champions Fitness Club and Barrels Community Market; and several opportunities to be pampered, including massages from Agora Salon and Day Spa and hair styling from Prime Cut Salon.

    “Awareness is key, because we can’t do anything if we’re not aware,” said Sue Bradshaw, a Belgrade resident who has attended the annual event for at least the last half-dozen years.

    After having a bone density screening and finishing a reflexology massage by Mary’s Massage and Bodywork, Bradshaw was heading back to the gymnasium at Thomas College, with its cooking and yoga demonstrations and most of the booths and informational material.

    Bradshaw sees the event as a quintessential place to promote women’s health.

    “It’s kind of scary thinking about doing these different screenings by yourself and what it may mean,” she said, “but here it’s the community coming together to ease that fear. They have materials we can take home and reference and contacts you can make to ask more questions.”

    While Bradshaw said there was some self-motivation in maintaining a healthy lifestyle year-round, the annual Inland Women’s Wellness event is a perfect impetus for women to come together.

    “I think it’s good that a lot of women come in groups or with friends so they can keep each other motivated year-round,” she said. “You’re accountable.”

    While medical information and awareness was the main purpose, committing to a healthy lifestyle was an ongoing theme, according to Dyer.

    “The motto this year is ‘It’s a Jungle Out There,’ and we need to break down the barriers on how to maintain good health,” Dyer said. “We need to make the healthy choice the easy choice.”

    One way in demonstrating that was with Hannaford registered dietitian Mary Lavanway, who, with the help of Hannaford employees, cooked several healthful dishes for sampling, including salmon and pork. She also put on two demonstrations, “Putting the Fast back in Breakfast” and “Real Food, Real Easy.”

    “I think people want some really good trustworthy knowledge and information about healthy lifestyles, and they want to be an advocate for their own health,” she said. “So they’re coming to something like this to gain knowledge and gain information and to find resources to go back to.”

    For Barrels Community Market manager Melissa Hackett, eating healthfully goes hand in hand with a health fair.

    “An event like the wellness fair, food is wellness,” she said. “I take the approach that food is fuel and you have to think about your body and what you’re putting into it, because it matters.”

    Jesse Scardina can be contacted at 861-9239 or at:

    jscardina@centralmaine.com

    Twitter: @jessescardina

    Were you interviewed for this story? If so, please fill out our accuracy form

    Send question/comment to the editors



    Apr 4, 2014
    Nancy Upton

    Weekly 5: Weekend getaway by train

    Traveling by train is not only faster than by road but it also offers lush, beautiful scenery to accompany your journey. For those wanting to make the most of the upcoming long-Easter weekend, starting April 18, a trip to one of these five charming destinations, which are within three hours of Jakarta or Bogor, may be a good choice.

    Check kereta-api.co.id, the official PT Kereta Api Indonesia (KAI) website, for reservation and schedule details.

    Bogor

    Upon arriving at Bogor Station in West Java, public minivans or taxis await to take you around the charming city, which is a foodie’s dream.

    One of the most renowned — and nearest — tourist destinations to the station is Kebun Raya Bogor (Bogor Botanical Garden). The 87-hectare garden is the perfect place for a picnic under the shade of one of its thousands of giant trees and plants. It also has a reflexology path, which is perfect for walking off that meal.

    Another nature friendly destination is Kuntum Nursery, which is only a few kilometers from the station.

    The nursery has a furniture gallery, a fish pond, food court and a fantastic herbs garden. The nursery is home to a handful of farm animals including goats, rabbits, ducks, cows and chickens.

    The commuter line to Bogor is accessible from various stations including Tangerang, Bekasi and Depok.

    Bandung

    The less than three-hour train trip to Bandung in West Java is a lovely experience in itself as it offers passengers plenty of a mooi indie (beautiful Indies) scenery.

    KAI provides six regular trips on the executive and business class train Argo Parahyangan, with ticket prices ranging from Rp 60,000 (US$5.3) to Rp 110,000.

    Most Jakartans know about the never-ending charm of Bandung, which, unfortunately, on weekends does become saturated with cars from the capital. The cooler climate is a draw for many, although the sheer array of culinary offerings the city is famed for are no numerous to mention. It is also a shopaholic’s heaven and offers more adventurous activities for families.

    Cianjur

    KAI only began operating the Pangrango train, which connects Bogor, Sukabumi to Cianjur, last year. The trip takes less than four hours from Bogor and offers miles-upon-miles of awe-inspiring views, taking in Mount Pangrango, hill, valleys and paddy fields.

    One of the more exciting destinations near Cianjur Station is the Gunung Padang Megalithic site in Karyamukti village. Many believe the structure to be older than the Egyptian pyramids and cite it as evidence that an advanced civilization had existed in the country for centuries. President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, who visited the site early in March, lauded the site as being one of the world’s oldest prehistoric monuments.

    Cirebon

    The northern-coastal city of Cirebon has many charms: food, batik, heritage and culture, all of are a result of the interesting blend between the Javanese, Sundanese, Chinese and Islamic cultures.

    KAI has five regular Cirebon Ekspress trains every day for those wanting to take the almost three-hour trip from Gambir Station in Central Jakarta to Cirebon Station in West Java.

    Other than the Cirebon Ekspress, there are 17 other trains, all long-haul serving eastward destinations, which are headed for as far as Surabaya.

    The city is not only a feast for the eyes, but also the stomach, with local dishes such as nasi jamblang (local rice buffet), nasi lengko (vegetarian rice) and tahu gejrot (tofu in hot and sour sauce) on top of the abundant seafood, which gave it its moniker of Prawn City. So fill up on the culinary delights before heading to the Trusmi batik center for the colorful megamendung batik.

    Sukabumi

    Local snacks such as the Japanese cake mochi and cilok (rice flour ball on a stick with peanut sauce) are among the popular treats you can try in this small town. For those that are green fingered or nature lovers, Selabintana, a popular resort and hotel, boasts a tea plantation and a plethora of decorative plants.

    There are three scheduled trains to Sukabumi every day, which take two hours from Bogor.

    However, the area offers more than just food and tea, so it is best to rent a car and visit the many options, which include waterfalls, caves as well as the Pangrango, Halimun and Gede mountains.

    Apr 3, 2014
    Nancy Upton

    Weymouth wants to regulate bodywork industry


    Christian Schiavone

    The Patriot Ledger


    Posted Apr. 2, 2014 @ 4:05 am
    Updated Apr 2, 2014 at 6:32 AM


    Apr 2, 2014
    Nancy Upton

    Reflexology Basics

    Understanding natural therapy alternatives

    Reflexology is a natural therapy that can be used for pain relief and relaxation.  Join members of the Reflexology Association of Australia as they explain how and why the ancient art of reflexology works.   Discover how massaging and pressing various reflex points on the hands, feet, ears and face can affect overall health.  Learn how Reflexology has become an established form of natural healing and is now gaining acceptance world-wide.  

    Reflexology Basics
    Free. Bookings essential.

    Caloundra Library Wednesday 14 May, 10.00 am
    Coolum Library Friday 2 May, 10.00 am
    Kawana Library Monday 5 May, 10.00 am
    Maleny Library Saturday 10 May, 9.30 am
    Maroochydore Library Friday 23 May, 10.00 am
    Nambour Library Wednesday 7 May, 10.00 am

    Apr 1, 2014
    Nancy Upton

    Special to The Pineapple


    How Laura Norman Transformed My Life

    By Diane Stone
    Special to The Pineapple

    “When nothing goes right, go left!”
    - Anonymous

    Have you ever met a person who quickly becomes a course changer on your path? An individual who inspires, delights and expands your consciousness to a level where each moment thereafter you experience the blessing of your union? I have been blessed to meet some along my life’s journey.

    These special angels that appeared on my path may have initially seemed to be a detour from my original route but, in retrospect, they were actually leading me back to myself. Such has been my experience with world-renowned Life Wellness Coach, Reflexologist and Delray Beach resident, Laura Norman.

    I had the pleasure of meeting Laura when a dear friend gave me a gift certificate for a session with her. I was a big fan of full-body massage and, until I met Laura, it didn’t even seem logical to opt for just the feet when you could have your entire body massaged.

    Boy, was I in for a surprise!

    Before I entered Laura’s peaceful sanctuary in Delray Beach, I was in a state of semi-unease. I had reentered the world of career searching after taking time to raise my daughter. I found the process more daunting than I had planned. I was rejected for jobs I didn’t even want and the hours and pay offered for most positions did not seem to warrant the time and commitment being asked for. I came to Laura as an escape from my distress, hoping her life coaching and reflexology would bring me comfort.

    Laura had me sit down on an extremely relaxing chair, offered me some purified water in a special glass and smiled gently upon my soul like an angel sending me a vibrational healing. I figured I would capitalize on her mystical enchantment and ask her what she thought I shoulddowithmycareer-orratherlackthereof! Clearly, this smiling, warm, compassionate soul would know what I was to do!

    In her charming, unassuming manner, Laura gently pointed out that I had all the answers within me, and that she would help me discover them for myself.

    This was not what I wanted to hear!

    I have always prided myself on being a goal-oriented taskmaster that merely required a script that I could tackle, master, and then move on to next, loftier goal. Even so, I surrendered to the moment and listened intently. I somehow knew this was a gift and I was willing to receive it. As I spoke, Laura reflected on how my choice of words affected how I felt. She encouraged me to be mindful to select words that make me feel good, which serve to shift my energy and outcome. If I opted to share something unpleasant, Laura advised using the phrase “in the past” before or after the statement to remove any power from the old thought pattern.

    At first, this was challenging. She asked that I focus on what I desire, rather than explain what was showing up in my life that I didn’t want. I noticed, even in our initial meeting that I was already feeling more empowered!

    Before long, by implementing Laura’s strategies, the career I had always wanted opened up!

    As it became clear that the hours I was investing in my new job were more than I wanted to expend, I sought out Laura’s counsel again. She reminded me to keep focusing on what I desired. She said “This or better!” and it became my chant! I willingly surrendered what seemed “safe” and have now created my own unique career path that empowers women to listen to their inner voices and honor their sacred internal wisdom. This journey has led me to discover more joy and abundance than I had ever imagined.

    During my series of life wellness coaching sessions with Laura, I also gave myself sessions to experience her reflexology gift. The experience was heavenly! The aromatherapy caused pleasant shifts in my brain chemistry. I experienced her gentle, yet firm pressure on my soles as a tingly, delightful internal massage in my head and behind my eyes.

    I imagined butterfly wings caressing my inner eyes. I heard a harp although Laura later told me no harps were on the CD she was playing. In Laura’s trademark fashion, she credited me with the extraordinary sensations that radiated throughout my body. Laura said she was merely the facilitator. It was my allowing consciousness that gave me the fullness of the healing!

    I have been so inspired by Laura and the magnitude of the profound positive changes in my life, that I enrolled in her Reflexology Training program in Boynton Beach. I wanted to be able to offer the gift of complete relaxation to my family and friends. Thanks to Laura I have come to learn that my most powerful intervention with anyone starts with me being at peace with myself and surrendering to my higher Self.

    Diana Stone, Writer, Speaker, Wellness Consultant and Delray Beach resident • www.dianalynnstone.com

    Related posts:

    1. Living a Compassionate Life


    PineappleAll, Health and StyleMarch 31, 2014

    Mar 31, 2014
    Nancy Upton

    Medicine’s Alternatives

    Business







    Richard W. Howard and his daughter Sara, who encouraged her father to try innovative cancer therapy techniques at New Milford Hospital during his illness.

    View and purchase photos

    NEW MILFORD Richard W. Howard battled cancer for 10 years, only sharing his diagnosis with his immediate family for nine of those years. Then his hair loss and other radiation side effects started to become apparent to those around him.

    During that decade before he finally lost his fight with the disease three months ago, Mr. Howard remained at the helm of his engineering company, not losing ground and even gaining some when he started innovative therapy techniques at New Milford Hospital.

    His daughter, Sara Howard, gave her father the push he needed to try integrative medicine at New Milford Hospital, providing him some means of comfort at the end of his decade-long battle with cancer.

    “I was like, ‘Dad, why not just try it? What could go wrong?’ I researched it and saw all the beneficial things it could do. He did and it was like, ‘Wow!” and opened up this door for him to a whole other side of medicine.”

    Mr. Howard’s love of the therapy was obvious even after he passed. Ms. Twombley said Mr. Howard asked that memorial gifts be made to the Integrative Medicine department. Gifts can be made to Integrative Medicine Services Department c/o New Milford Hospital, 21 Elm Street, New Milford, CT 06776.

    The therapy Mr. Howard used to reduce pain caused by the cancer and to promote natural healing is integrative medicine, a relatively new treatment program that began at New Milford Hospital in 2010 as a pilot program. Integrative Medicine incorporates a number of different modalities, including acupuncture, reflexology and massage therapy, therapeutic touch, hypnotherapy, and kripala yoga/meditation.

    Susan Twombley, coordinator of Integrative Medicines at the hospital, said the pilot program was received well by patients.

    “We had our growing pains with the medical establishment accepting it, but everyone has worked together and communicated well,” Ms. Twombley said. “In 2014, it is going strong for patients, the medical and integrative therapists and the clinicians, who all work well together. It is a thriving program and much appreciated by patients and staff.”

    Although the alternative treatment methods are now thriving with patients, some patients are still initially skeptical, as was the case with Mr. Howard who had to be pushed into participating.

    “Mr. Howard was by trade an engineer, and was more linear and scientific in his thinking,” said Jessica Ifshin, the acupuncturist on staff at the hospital and who treated Howard, using the technique. Continued…

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    “Originally, he was resistant to the idea of integrative medicine until his daughter grabbed him by the scruff of the neck and made him sign up,” said Ms. Ifshin. “I remember his second or third treatment—he didn’t tell me he had a lot of tension in his inner groin. After the second treatment, he asked, ‘Is it possible acupuncture could change this?’ He pulled his leg up and said he couldn’t do that earlier that morning. He started asking questions that were a little more esoteric—mind and spirit questions—looking for answers Western medicine could not give. This was a man trying to embrace the power of both Western and Eastern medicine.”

    Ms. Ifshin, Lic., Ac., Dipl.OM, is no stranger to working to bring together medicine from both hemispheres, as she is a practitioner of East Asian Medicine and the owner of Eastern Body Wellness, also located in New Milford.

    For 13 years, beginning in 1997, Ms. Ifshin practiced East Asian Medicine in California before she decided to bring her expertise in the “ancient healing wisdom” to the East Coast. She treats oncology patients at the New Milford Hospital’s Regional Cancer Center, and sees an entire spectrum of patients beyond that—addressing conditions ranging from infertility, hypertension, and allergies to depression and stress/anger management.

    Ms. Ifshin said acupuncture is a great way to mitigate the difficult cancer treatments and the side effects that result—the neuropathy in feet and hands, digestive difficulties, mental anxiety, and difficulty sleeping. After four years at the hospital, Ms. Ifshin said about 60 percent of patients are open to trying acupuncture and 40 percent are not. However, she said with those patients that do try it, the retention rate is 85 to 90 percent.

    Ms. Howard remembers encouraging her father to try integrative medicine. For years he had been getting the typical cancer treatments and a steady regimen of drugs at hospitals such as Yale and Columbia. She said her father was proactive, asking the doctors there what he could do besides taking the drugs, but no solutions such as just changing his diet, were mentioned to him.

    “Basically, when he would go there, it would be awful,” Ms. Howard said. “You would be there an entire day, sitting and waiting—it was very impersonal. But when he came to New Milford, he could be at work, could come for a 10-minute treatment, and leave. Everyone loved him here and it opened the door to integrative medicine. He had been coming here for a little over a year and I wish he had come sooner. Integrative medicine really helped him so much with the side effects and spiritually. It was unfortunate that he didn’t come here earlier. People here cared about not just him, but the family. I am now getting Integrative Medicine treatments that help me spiritually.”

    That relief experienced by Mr. Howard and a change in his views toward different types of medicine is something Gabriele Cronin, LMT, who offers reflexology at the hospital, said her patients feel almost every day.

    “Almost every day a skeptical person becomes a believer,” Ms. Cronin said.

    Ms. Cronin, who also treated Mr. Howard, said that reflexology is done on the feet, although hands and ears are also appropriate sites. She said charts of the sole of the foot display how different pressure points correlate to inner muscles and bones. Ms. Twombley said that Ms. Cronin can often tell if someone has an ailment from interacting with their feet.

    “I don’t ever diagnose,” said Ms. Cronin, “but to explain the miracle, I might mention a part of the body that comes up in the foot. Feet are the last part of the body to pick up on [a disease]. I pick up on uric acid. Sometimes there is a weakness, or a bruise and these signs would be in the part of the body represented. Continued…

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    Ms. Cronin said she once did reflexology on a diabetic teenager with the result that he did not have to take the same level of medication for quite a while.

    “It works especially with illnesses due to nervous conditions of body,” she said, “and is good for the digestive system.”

    In addition to the other integrative medicinal therapies mentioned, the hospital also offers a program called “Strong Women, Strong Bones,” which features instructional exercise classes that teach weight and balance for middle aged and older women to stop or reverse osteoporosis. Ms. Twombley said the program, out of Tufts, includes certified instructors and has been well received by patients.

    The program serves 48 patients—29 in New Milford, seven in Washington and 12 in Kent. Classes are offered in seven-week sessions and Ms. Twombley said a number of patients sign up repeatedly for the sessions.

    “There are a number of different approaches and exercises,” Ms. Twombley said. “To improve balance, they might balance on one foot or with one foot behind the other. Exercising with light weights is a big part of the program. It is not overly rigorous, but can definitely increase agility and muscle strength.”

    Ms. Twombley said an early offering in Integrative Medicine was called Reiki, which has morphed into Therapeutic Touch. The hospital has a permanent practitioner who offers the therapy.

    “Ironically, there is no touching,” Ms. Twombley said. “It is very much energy driving. It’s amazing what you can tell from a person’s energy. I’ve experienced it firsthand.”

    All the practitioners make rounds according to their hours and average about 12 to 14 hours a week. Three units—the ICU, the endoscopy department and the cancer center—are always covered, five days a week. Ms. Twombley said the practitioners are paid on a per diem or hourly basis.

    The practitioners treat patients—including cancer patients like Mr. Howard, fellow workers who may be fatigued and starting last July, Integrative Medicine was expanded and offered to the community. Those interested can sign up through the gift shop.

    Rates are $55 an hour for acupuncture, which is offered Mondays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., $25 per half hour for reflexology and $45 for 45 minutes of massage therapy, which are both offered on Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., and $22 for 30 minutes of therapeutic touch, which is offered on Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 12 noon. Continued…

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    NEW MILFORD Richard W. Howard battled cancer for 10 years, only sharing his diagnosis with his immediate family for nine of those years. Then his hair loss and other radiation side effects started to become apparent to those around him.

    During that decade before he finally lost his fight with the disease three months ago, Mr. Howard remained at the helm of his engineering company, not losing ground and even gaining some when he started innovative therapy techniques at New Milford Hospital.

    His daughter, Sara Howard, gave her father the push he needed to try integrative medicine at New Milford Hospital, providing him some means of comfort at the end of his decade-long battle with cancer.

    “I was like, ‘Dad, why not just try it? What could go wrong?’ I researched it and saw all the beneficial things it could do. He did and it was like, ‘Wow!” and opened up this door for him to a whole other side of medicine.”

    Mr. Howard’s love of the therapy was obvious even after he passed. Ms. Twombley said Mr. Howard asked that memorial gifts be made to the Integrative Medicine department. Gifts can be made to Integrative Medicine Services Department c/o New Milford Hospital, 21 Elm Street, New Milford, CT 06776.

    The therapy Mr. Howard used to reduce pain caused by the cancer and to promote natural healing is integrative medicine, a relatively new treatment program that began at New Milford Hospital in 2010 as a pilot program. Integrative Medicine incorporates a number of different modalities, including acupuncture, reflexology and massage therapy, therapeutic touch, hypnotherapy, and kripala yoga/meditation.

    Susan Twombley, coordinator of Integrative Medicines at the hospital, said the pilot program was received well by patients.

    “We had our growing pains with the medical establishment accepting it, but everyone has worked together and communicated well,” Ms. Twombley said. “In 2014, it is going strong for patients, the medical and integrative therapists and the clinicians, who all work well together. It is a thriving program and much appreciated by patients and staff.”

    Although the alternative treatment methods are now thriving with patients, some patients are still initially skeptical, as was the case with Mr. Howard who had to be pushed into participating.

    “Mr. Howard was by trade an engineer, and was more linear and scientific in his thinking,” said Jessica Ifshin, the acupuncturist on staff at the hospital and who treated Howard, using the technique.

    “Originally, he was resistant to the idea of integrative medicine until his daughter grabbed him by the scruff of the neck and made him sign up,” said Ms. Ifshin. “I remember his second or third treatment—he didn’t tell me he had a lot of tension in his inner groin. After the second treatment, he asked, ‘Is it possible acupuncture could change this?’ He pulled his leg up and said he couldn’t do that earlier that morning. He started asking questions that were a little more esoteric—mind and spirit questions—looking for answers Western medicine could not give. This was a man trying to embrace the power of both Western and Eastern medicine.”

    Ms. Ifshin, Lic., Ac., Dipl.OM, is no stranger to working to bring together medicine from both hemispheres, as she is a practitioner of East Asian Medicine and the owner of Eastern Body Wellness, also located in New Milford.

    For 13 years, beginning in 1997, Ms. Ifshin practiced East Asian Medicine in California before she decided to bring her expertise in the “ancient healing wisdom” to the East Coast. She treats oncology patients at the New Milford Hospital’s Regional Cancer Center, and sees an entire spectrum of patients beyond that—addressing conditions ranging from infertility, hypertension, and allergies to depression and stress/anger management.

    Ms. Ifshin said acupuncture is a great way to mitigate the difficult cancer treatments and the side effects that result—the neuropathy in feet and hands, digestive difficulties, mental anxiety, and difficulty sleeping. After four years at the hospital, Ms. Ifshin said about 60 percent of patients are open to trying acupuncture and 40 percent are not. However, she said with those patients that do try it, the retention rate is 85 to 90 percent.

    Ms. Howard remembers encouraging her father to try integrative medicine. For years he had been getting the typical cancer treatments and a steady regimen of drugs at hospitals such as Yale and Columbia. She said her father was proactive, asking the doctors there what he could do besides taking the drugs, but no solutions such as just changing his diet, were mentioned to him.

    “Basically, when he would go there, it would be awful,” Ms. Howard said. “You would be there an entire day, sitting and waiting—it was very impersonal. But when he came to New Milford, he could be at work, could come for a 10-minute treatment, and leave. Everyone loved him here and it opened the door to integrative medicine. He had been coming here for a little over a year and I wish he had come sooner. Integrative medicine really helped him so much with the side effects and spiritually. It was unfortunate that he didn’t come here earlier. People here cared about not just him, but the family. I am now getting Integrative Medicine treatments that help me spiritually.”

    That relief experienced by Mr. Howard and a change in his views toward different types of medicine is something Gabriele Cronin, LMT, who offers reflexology at the hospital, said her patients feel almost every day.

    “Almost every day a skeptical person becomes a believer,” Ms. Cronin said.

    Ms. Cronin, who also treated Mr. Howard, said that reflexology is done on the feet, although hands and ears are also appropriate sites. She said charts of the sole of the foot display how different pressure points correlate to inner muscles and bones. Ms. Twombley said that Ms. Cronin can often tell if someone has an ailment from interacting with their feet.

    “I don’t ever diagnose,” said Ms. Cronin, “but to explain the miracle, I might mention a part of the body that comes up in the foot. Feet are the last part of the body to pick up on [a disease]. I pick up on uric acid. Sometimes there is a weakness, or a bruise and these signs would be in the part of the body represented.

    Ms. Cronin said she once did reflexology on a diabetic teenager with the result that he did not have to take the same level of medication for quite a while.

    “It works especially with illnesses due to nervous conditions of body,” she said, “and is good for the digestive system.”

    In addition to the other integrative medicinal therapies mentioned, the hospital also offers a program called “Strong Women, Strong Bones,” which features instructional exercise classes that teach weight and balance for middle aged and older women to stop or reverse osteoporosis. Ms. Twombley said the program, out of Tufts, includes certified instructors and has been well received by patients.

    The program serves 48 patients—29 in New Milford, seven in Washington and 12 in Kent. Classes are offered in seven-week sessions and Ms. Twombley said a number of patients sign up repeatedly for the sessions.

    “There are a number of different approaches and exercises,” Ms. Twombley said. “To improve balance, they might balance on one foot or with one foot behind the other. Exercising with light weights is a big part of the program. It is not overly rigorous, but can definitely increase agility and muscle strength.”

    Ms. Twombley said an early offering in Integrative Medicine was called Reiki, which has morphed into Therapeutic Touch. The hospital has a permanent practitioner who offers the therapy.

    “Ironically, there is no touching,” Ms. Twombley said. “It is very much energy driving. It’s amazing what you can tell from a person’s energy. I’ve experienced it firsthand.”

    All the practitioners make rounds according to their hours and average about 12 to 14 hours a week. Three units—the ICU, the endoscopy department and the cancer center—are always covered, five days a week. Ms. Twombley said the practitioners are paid on a per diem or hourly basis.

    The practitioners treat patients—including cancer patients like Mr. Howard, fellow workers who may be fatigued and starting last July, Integrative Medicine was expanded and offered to the community. Those interested can sign up through the gift shop.

    Rates are $55 an hour for acupuncture, which is offered Mondays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., $25 per half hour for reflexology and $45 for 45 minutes of massage therapy, which are both offered on Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., and $22 for 30 minutes of therapeutic touch, which is offered on Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 12 noon.

    Hypnotherapy is offered Fridays from 10 a.m. to noon at a rate of $40 for 30 minutes and Kripala yoga/meditation is $60 for an hour session on Tuesdays for a private or group session between the hours of 11:45 a.m. and 4:15 p.m. The yoga has an emphasis on breathing and stretching to release chronic pain, tension and holding patterns in the body.

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    Mar 30, 2014
    Nancy Upton

    A kenning of Evelynn Tierney of Physiokells Health Services

    Bright Blessings of the Spring.

    Your friendly neighborhood Detroit Paganism Examiner had the chance to share cosmic space with Evelynn Tierney of Physiokells Health Services recently. Getting to know this dynamo of a woman over coffee and egg sandwiches at Country Boy Restaurant, in her new locale of Hazel Park, was like visiting with a combination of Muse, Medical Magician, and Crusader.

    She was kind enough to consent to an interview, so take a moment to brew your own cuppa and journey onward into the new portal to Health she is bringing to this area. Completed this Wednesday, it was quite the look into a driven Dreamer and Healer.

    “You are new in town, so tell us about where you came from before you moved to Hazel Park?”

    “I was living in Port Huron by the Blue Water Bridge. I operated my company out of the apartment I was living in there.

    “What made you decide this area?”

    “I decided on Hazel Park because the city of Detroit was calling to me, and a very dear friend of mine was willing to open his home to me so I could relocate.”

    “So, what exactly is Physiokells Health Services?”

    PhysioKells Health Services is a Holistic Wellness company dedicated to chemical free health care, preventative medicine, and giving people the answers and solutions that mainstream medicine can not offer, in a very affordable way.

    “How did the name come about?”

    I meditated for days and did a lot of research. The name is very personal. I chose Physio for the body, and Kells for the book of Kells in Ireland, as that is where my heritage originates.”

    “And what inspired you to become a Naturopath?”

    Growing up, I was a very sickly child. I was always at the doctors and couldn’t participate in a lot of activities that classmates could. I grew up with various pain issues and stomach problems. My parents took me to every doctor they found, in and out of Michigan, and nobody could give them answers. This is not to mention all of the medicines they put me on, and all the testing they did just seemed to make things worse. When I was about about 14, an aunt of mine recommended I see an ND in Mount Pleasant, so I figured I’d give it a try. Within 30 minutes, she gave me an answer. I had Lupus, and she put me on a regimen of supplements and an anti inflammatory diet. Within a month, I was off of all pharmaceuticals and 100% better. From then on, I self studied Naturopathy and only went to see holistic doctors. I wanted to help people the same way my ND helped me.

    “How long would you say that you have been formally studying?”

    Well, I self studied as a teen for 4 years. I then took online course at Clayton College of Natural Health, Blue Heron Academy, and several online certificate programs in various areas such as enzymes and probiotics. I then incorporated western medicine into my background to really understand both sides of it, so about 8 yrs all together.

    “Where have you trained?”

    Clayton College of Natural Health, Blue Heron Academy, DoTerra University, Macomb Community College, and Baker College along with being trained, and certified, in company provided courses for major supplement brands I have worked for.”

    “What forms of treatment do you use?”

    I offer Massage Therapy, Reiki, Reflexology, Iridology, Homeopathic Reflexology, herbs, essential oils, homeopathic medicine, and other body work. I inform everyone of their options and help them choose the best course at the best price for them.”

    “How are you different from allopathic medicine in your approach to healing?”

    I differ in the methods I use to find the problem. I allow the body to tell me what it needs or whats wrong. The ways I use to treat are tailored to the patient’s body chemistry, so we are not over or under dosing, and everything I use is whole medicine and chemical free.

    “How would you compare your personal experiences with natural vs. allopathic medicine in your own life?”

    I believe Naturopathy gave me my life back. I have used Western Medicine since then and believe there will always be a need of some degree for Western Medicine, but i believe the quality of care that Naturopathy has brought me far surpasses Western.

    “What part does chemistry play in how you set up a regimen for a client?”

    “Chemistry plays a big part. The body has a very delicate balance between alkaline and acidic, which is why I custom tailor the regimen based on what I have discussed with the patient.”

    “Would you like to talk about your former job and the effect of your transition from that field has had on you?”

    I have worked in both fields of Naturopathy and Westen Medicine for over 10 years. I have seen the good, and the bad, in both industries. The general population is completely uninformed of their choices in health care. That’s why I have decided to leave the Western Medicine Industry and use my talents and education as a healing facilitator, to educate and and help people reach their optimum wellness.”

    “In what ways would you say that natural medicines have made a comeback in recent years?”

    When the economy crashed a few years ago, people realized “herbal remedies” were much more affordable, especially after so many lost their healthcare coverage and they found “hey this really works so lets stick with it”.

    “Do you feel that it is an either/or option when someone selects their forms of treatment? Can both approaches be used at the same time in a cooperative fashion?”

    “Absolutely. To believe Naturopathic Medicine should be the only medicine is completely radical. I know there is a need for allopathic medicine, but it should be used only in emergency situations or as a last regimen of treatment. If we keep the body health through Naturopathy, there won’t be a need for the use of Western Medicine. But with that being said, yes they should be used together when a person is trying to heal themselves and get off of Western medicines. There’s a fine balance of weening that needs to happen.

    “What changes would you like to see in the Health Insurance Industry in regards to Holistic care?”

    I’m actually becoming involved with the American Holistic Medical Association to petition Naturopthy be covered by health insurance. Also, I would like for all Western Medicine doctors be educated at least 1 year in Naturopathy and be allowed to prescribe lifestyle changes and whole medicine instead of just handing over a chemical script.”

    “How do you think this can be brought about?”

    Through education.”

    “What is the most important factor in making the decision to take control of your own health?”

    You just have to want to get well and know that it is possible.

    “Are there any cautions that you would like to let people know to be aware of when selecting a Naturopath?”

    Yes, the Naturopath, or healing facilitator, you see needs to make your healthcare the priority by making sure they answer all of your questions, explaining all of your options to you, and making sure you are the one in charge of your wellness. Also, arrogance is never a good sign.

    “What part do herbs and oils play in your business?”

    A major part. They are for sale in my online store, but I also use them in the care of my patients

    “Do you have a preference of product lines?”

    My oils are DoTerra. I believe they are, by far, the best product for the best price as far as herbs and other supplements go. Brand doesn’t matter as long as the have a guarantee to be free of pesticides and additives and come from whole sources, not isolate sources. I do extensive research on the brands I use and they are all of quality.”

    “You make some of your own products as well, is that correct?”

    Yes. I make handcrafted Reiki energy hemp and copper jewelry. Also, I use my herbs and oils to make organic handmade bath products for men, women, and children. I also have a sports line for any pain issues.”

    “How much fun is involved in the creative process?”

    It is a blast!!!!! I love creating my products with my hands. It makes my heart smile that I’m genuinely helping people by offering a chemical free option.

    “What is your favorite product you have made so far?”

    Thats a tough question. If i have to pick, it would be the copper jewelry.”

    “Do you offer your line of products as part of your regular merchandise, or are they exclusively for your patients under treatment?”

    They are for both patients and general merchandise. The handmade products are non profit and the proceeds to to a different charity every month.”

    “Are you planning to continue school?”

    Absolutly. I plan on continung to getting my Doctorate in Naturopathy and becoming a ND. Also, I will be taking insurance courses to learn the system better, why they dont allow alternative therapy to be covered, and how we can change that.

    “What other projects will you be pursuing for the next year? Any plans on events?”

    “I will be booking as many vendor shows as I can. Also, I will be putting on education seminars such as my Medicine Cabinet Makeover seminar.”

    “What is the most common misconception you run into about what you actually do?”

    “I am always asked if I have a formal education. My response is always, “Of course i do! I’m a legally licensed company to operate in alternative medicine”. Also, I’m always told its such a luxury to get a massage, or the herbs are “voodoo” medicine. I have found people are afraid of what they don’t understand. We live in a society that was raised to trust only western doctors and the FDA, which is why i plan to educate with facts and history.”

    “What is the funniest thing that ever happened while you were training in this field?”

    While in school learning my extractions, I once mixed garlic with baking soda and vinegar, thinking I had the right ingredients, and it foamed up and went every where. The classroom smelled like overpowering garlic for a few days and I was teased ever since. I couldn’t stop laughing while my eyes watered from the garlic.”

    “Where do you see your business in two years?”

    I would like to see it have expanded to various locations around Metro Detroit and even out of state. Also I’d like to expand the list of services we provide.

    “Bonus Question: If you had to choose a song about your life so far, what would it be?”

    “‘Joy To The World’ by Three Dog Night.”

    “Where can someone get in touch with you if they are ready to give your business a try?”

    I am on Facebook, I have a webpage, Angie’s http://www.examiner.com/node/70766176/editList and all other social media sites.”

    You can book an appointment with Physiokells Health Services through their Facebook page. Located in Hazel Park, the office is conveniently located near Detroit, Ferndale, Madison Heights, and Royal Oak. Call them at (586) 443-3934, or email Evelynn at evelynntierney88@yahoo.com.

    For an up close opportunity to speak to her and sample her wares, you can find her at the Second Annual Mystic Gathering, located at The Royal Oak Senior Community Center, 3500 Marais Ave, Royal Oak, on May 3 from 12:30 pm to 4:30 pm. An event to raise funds for Arise Spiritual Retreat and Wellness Center, the admission is $10.00 and Physiokells will be there.

    Blessed Be.

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