Browsing articles in "reflexology"
Aug 22, 2014
Nancy Upton

Try a reflexology taster day for charity

Try a reflexology taster day for charity

Try a reflexology taster day for charity

Have a relaxing reflexology treatment and help raise money for a life saving charity.

Enjoy a 20 minute taster treatment for £8 or a 45 minute treatment is £15 at the Bell Inn, Castle Hedingham today with the money raised going to Marie Curie Cancer Care.

It costs £20 an hour to provide a nurse to care for a terminally sick person in their own home.

For more information visit facebook.com/lisa.venebles66.

Showbiz news
  • Hopkins accepts obesity challenge

  • Miley Cyrus gets ‘morality’ gig ban

  • Pattinson takes the ice challenge

  • Chloe Moretz: I love a tearjerker

  • J-Lo releases tell-all love book

  • Katie Holmes was nervous young mum

Aug 21, 2014
Nancy Upton

Health Happenings – Newnan Times

• Women with Depression – Open discussion, prayer, and continued support through difficult days for women with depression. Meets 7 p.m. Tuesdays at Crossroads Church, 2564 Hwy. 154, southeast of Newnan. Details: http://crossroadsnewnan.org .

• Survivors of Suicide (SOS) Support Group – Meets second Mondays, 7-9 p.m. Room 112 of Crossroads Church, Highway 154 Campus, Newnan. Free and open to anyone who has lost someone to suicide. Details: Lynn and Nancy Bradley, facilitators, at 770-251-6216.

• Crossroads Faith Riders’ “4th Annual Wisdom Ride” is now Saturday, Aug. 23 (changed from Aug. 16), to benefit Cambridge House of Newnan Alzheimer’s Day Program. Riders meet at Gene Evans Great South Harley Davidson, 185 E. Hwy. 16. Registration 9 a.m., coffee and donuts. Kickstands up 10:30 and riders return to Great South Harley Davidson for lunch, a 50/50 Raffle and general raffle for merchandise. Cambridge House Enrichment Center is a non-profit organization providing personal care to adults with Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, and other functional disabilities. As a daytime adult health care provider, Cambridge House offers caregivers an affordable alternative to nursing home care or assisted living. Details: Ron LaSocha of Crossroads Faith Riders, 678-357-6855.

• Sunrise on the Square Road Race, held annually by Main Street Newnan, is Aug. 30 – Saturday of Labor Day weekend. Route begins and ends in downtown Newnan. For information and an application contact the Main Street office on First Avenue or check at http://www.mainstreetnewnan.com.

• Lunch and Learn, “Reflexology: What Is It and What Can It Do for You” – Bring your lunch to Newnan Carnegie Library, 1 LaGrange St., Tuesday, Aug. 27, noon. Join Jeanette Jackson, of Footpaths Reflexology, an ARCB certified Reflexologist who will be discussing what the natural therapy of Reflexology is and the potential benefits. Details: 770-683-1347.

• “Gentle Yoga” is Thursday, Aug. 28, 2:30 p.m. at Newnan Carnegie Library, 1 LaGrange St. at Court Square. Certified instructor, Yvette Monet, guides gentle yoga includes floor exercise for adults and seniors. Benefit from stress relief, flexibility, stretching and strengthening. Wear comfortable clothes and shoes. For all levels of physical ability. Details: 770-683-1347.

• Parkinson’s Support Group meets at First United Methodist Church, Greenville Street in Newnan, second Tuesdays at 3:45 p.m. Meets in the Gathering Room. Caregivers welcome. Details: First United Methodist, 770-253-7400. Next: Sept. 9.

• Benefit concert for Alzheimer’s – Greg Bickley and the Tokyo Joe band perform music made famous by Sir Elton John in a benefit for the fight against Alzheimer’s disease. “Rocketman: A Tribute to Sir Elton John” is Sept. 12, 7 p.m. at Southern Ground Amphitheater, Fayetteville. Proceeds benefit Southern Crescent Walk to End Alzheimer’s and the Alzheimer’s Association-Georgia Chapter. Walk will have participants from seven counties: Clayton, Coweta, Fayette, Henry, Meriwether, South Fulton, and Spalding. Tickets $35 in advance or $40 at gate. Tables for eight $350. Tickets online at www.rocketmanbenefitconcert.org. Corporate sponsorships available. Details: Emily Richter at 404-728-6059 or Kim Cox at sold@coxcorealestate.com .

• Coweta Gluten-Free Support Group meets third Mondays at 7 p.m. at Crossroads Church, Hwy. 154 campus (near Thomas Crossroads), Room 112. Details: Kathie Kaercher 770-253-3926. Next: Sept. 15.

• CrossFit Newnan 2nd annual Fall Golf Tournament to benefit Coweta County Special Olympics is Sept. 22 at Newnan Country Club, 1356 U.S. Hwy. 29 North, Newnan. Scramble format, 4-person teams. Longest drive, closest to pin contests. Entry $95 per person, $380 per team – includes breakfast, range practice, green fees, cart and lunch. Those who do not have team can be paired with others for tournament. Send check to CrossFit Newnan, 120 Werz Industrial Drive, Newnan, GA 30263 or pay with credit card by emailing information to crossfitnewnan@gmail.com . Details: 678-978-3400. Hole sponsorships through Sept. 1– email mrp@numail.org.

• The 15th annual Southern Crescent Walk to End Alzheimer’s is Saturday, Oct. 4, at Frederick Brown, Jr. Amphitheater in Peachtree City. To join the walk, start a team or donate visit act.alz.org/southerncrescent. Organized by Peachtree City co-founder Floy Farr in 2000, more than $1.2 million has been raised to assist Georgians with Alzheimer’s and their caregivers. Walk calls on participants of all ages and abilities to reclaim the future for millions. Details: Sue Shaffer at alzwalk.ptc@gmail.com.

• Coweta County Farmer’s Market is Wednesdays through summer in downtown Newnan in coordination with Main Street Newnan: 8 a.m. – 1 p.m. at the Historic Train Depot, East Broad Street. Also Saturdays 8 a.m. – 1 p.m. at Powell Expo Center, at Coweta County Recreation Department Temple Avenue Complex.

• Senior Friends provides fun, fellowship, education and entertainment to help people live a healthier, more fulfilling life. Sponsored by Piedmont Newnan Hospital. Meets 10:30 – 12:30 p.m. third Wednesdays at Coweta County Fairgrounds, Pine Road. Includes catered hot meal – $7. Meal reservations: 770-400-2374. Annual membership: $15 single, or $25 per couple. Details: 770-400-2374.

• Heart Healthy Class – Monthly last Tuesdays, 1 to 2:30 p.m., Piedmont Heart Institute, 20 Francis Way, Sharpsburg, third floor conference room. Register with cardiac rehab office, 678-854-2970.

• Scleroderma Support Group – Meets every other month. Bridge Community Center, 208 Willow Bend Rd., Peachtree City. Details: Richard or Barbara Moore, 770-252-1633.

• Celiac Disease Support Group – Second Saturdays, 1 p.m., Piedmont Newnan Hospital, Poplar Road, Bistro Conference Room, 0-019. Details: Bill Becker, 770-683-2613 or billbecker@numail.org. Chapter of Celiac Sprue Association/ USA.

• Alzheimer’s Disease Support Group – Third Wednesdays, 2 p.m., Savannah Court, 27 Belt Rd., Newnan. Details: Ellie Farrington, 770-253-4402.

• Lupus Support Group – Meets monthly at Country Inn and Suites, 1125 Newnan Crossing Blvd. E. First Mondays, 7 p.m. Details: Regina Olmstead, 404-550-5263.

• TOPS, Take Off Pounds Sensibly – Tuesdays, 7 p.m., Mt. Carmel United Methodist Church, 958 Summers-McKoy Rd., Newnan. First meeting free, annual dues $28.

• TOPS, Take Off Pounds Sensibly – Thomas Crossroads area. Meets Mondays; weigh-in 6:15 p.m., meeting to follow. Community Christian Church, 1717 Hwy. 154, Sharpsburg. Details, Ruth, 770-254-8913.

• Al-Anon Meetings – Mondays 7:30 p.m. Community Christian Church, Highway 154 at Lower Fayetteville. Details: Barbara, 678-876-0102.

• “Exercise is Medicine” is Mondays Fridays at Newnan Carnegie Library, 1 LaGrange St. in downtown Newnan, as well as Tuesdays at 2:30 p.m. and Thursday at 1 p.m. at the Piedmont Newnan Fitness Center on West Court Square. There is also a class held in the Cancer Wellness Center at Piedmont Hospital on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons at 4 p.m. All classes are free. Details: Piedmont Fitness Center at 770-254-3550.

• East Coweta Cancer Support Group – Meets 2 p.m. fourth Tuesdays at Senoia United Methodist Church, Bridge Seavy Streets. Emphasis also placed on role of the caregiver. Details: Ivie Bowman at 770-599-3245. Email: senoiaunitedmeth@bellsouth.net .

• Narcotics Anonymous – Meets Monday-Thursday 6 p.m., Fridays 7 p.m. and Saturdays 7:30 p.m., 9 Perry St., Newnan Club. Details: 678-758-3552.

• Multiple Sclerosis Support Group – Second Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m., Heatherwood Baptist Church, 721 Shenandoah Blvd., Newnan. Details: 770-502-1984.

• Alcoholics Anonymous – Meetings at Newnan Presbyterian, St. Paul’s, Ramah Baptist, Turin UMC, Senoia UMC, Grantville Baptist, and at 9 Perry St. in Newnan. Details on meetings: Chris, 770-842-4519.

• La Leche of Newnan – Mother to mother breastfeeding support offered. Call Lara McCarthy, 678-423-9881.

• Amputee Support Group Meeting – Details: 770-583-2158.

• Stroke Support Group – Meets third Thursdays, 4 p.m., Center for Therapeutic Recreation. Roosevelt Institute, Warm Springs. Details: 706-655-5658.

• Overeaters Anonymous – St. Andrew’s in the Pines Episcopal Church, Peachtree City, Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m. and Saturday, 8:30 a.m. Details: Barbara, 678-876-0102.

• Cancer Support Group of Coweta County will resume meetings in September at First Baptist Church of Newnan, 15 W. Washington St. Support group continues to provide information and services for cancer patients during the summer vacation months. CSG Durable Medical Equipment program is coordinated by John and Nancy Weinig, 770-502-1835. For details on group call Katie Jackson at 770-502-9097.

• Alzheimer’s Disease Support Group – First Thursdays, 10 a.m., Wesley Woods of Newnan, 2280 Hwy. 29 N. Details: Beth Lever, 770-683-6833.

• Kidney Smart – Piedmont Newnan Hospital and a local dialysis group hold classes second Wednesdays at Piedmont Newnan, Poplar Road, 4:30 p.m. One-hour class is free including materials. Fourth shift/ professional shift available for dialysis patients. Urgent Start program collaborates with hospitals regarding unexpected kidney failure in an attempt to avoid dialysis in center. Go to www.kidneysmart.org under “classes near you” to register. Classes offered across Georgia. Details: Cassandra Carson at 770-304-5850.

Aug 20, 2014
Nancy Upton

Let’s Get Out of Town: The Cheapest Labor Day Travel Deals

Plenty of outdoor activities await in Telluride  (Photo: Ben Bloom/Photodisc/Getty Images)

Related: Use It Or Lose It: Great Deals for a Last-Minute Summer Getaway

3. Palm Springs, Calif.

cheap-labor-day-trips

The early bird gets the cocktail at Omni Rancho Las Palmas (Photo: Omni Hotels Resorts)

The Omni Rancho Las Palmas is enticing couples who don’t want to waste a single minute of the end-of-summer sun in Palm Springs. It’s offering a couples package called “At Rancho’s Door by Four.” Starting Sept. 2, guests who check in Sunday through Thursday before 4 p.m. get two cocktails of choice, a 50-minute spa treatment, and a late check-out. Rates start at $189.

4. San Juan, Puerto Rico

cheap-san-juan-hotel

Imagine sipping champagne by this pool (Photo: El San Juan Resort, A Hilton Hotel)

Labor Day is a great excuse to break out the bubbly (But, really, what isn’t?). Hilton’s El San Juan Resort  Casino in Puerto Rico is partnering with Champagne maker Veuve Clicquot for a package called the Veuve Clicquot Labor Day Weekend Experience. Guests get flutes of Champagne upon arrival (That would make for a fun check-in.), and they will enjoy a five-course Champagne dinner and various other Champagne-related activities throughout their stay. The package is only available Friday, Aug. 29, through Tuesday, Sept. 2, and it costs $1,230 for one adult or $1,560 for two adults in the same room (Each additional person is $410, up to four total in a room). For more information or reservations, call 1-888-579-2635, or visit www.elsanjuanresort.com/veuveclicquot and request code PVC.

Related: Cheat Sheet: San Juan  

5. Sonoma, Calif.

california-wine-country

Another drinkers’ vacation option:  Sonoma, California (Photo: sean boggs/E+/Getty Images)

Continuing with the wine theme, Sonoma County is the place for wine lovers to be on Labor Day weekend. The area is celebrating Sonoma Wine Country Weekend, which brings together hundreds of the area’s winemakers, growers, and chefs. It’s a food and drink lover’s paradise. Travelodge Healdsburg-Sonoma Wine Country is offering a 20 percent discount for a stay of three consecutive nights.

Related: Get Your Booze On: 9 Cheap and Chic California Wine Country Stays

6. Nassau, Bahamas 

bahamas-travel-packages

Is a cheap package deal enough to lure you to The British Colonial Hilton in Nassau? (Stephen Vance/Flickr)

If you still want to head to the Bahamas this summer, here’s a travel deal you may want to look into. CheapOair is offering a sale on various vacation packages, including a three-night/four-day stay at the British Colonial Hilton for $588 per person (that includes airfare from Miami to Nassau). Travel is between August 29 and September 1. Check out CheapOAir’s website for sales on other vacation packages.

WATCH: How to Plan a Last-Minute Labor Day Weekend Getaway

 

7. Cape Cod, Mass.

cape-cod-vacation

Escape to the Cape (Photo: Sea Crest Beach Hotel)

The clock is ticking on your chances for a summer Cape Escape. Sea Crest Beach Hotel is offering 20 percent off stays on Aug. 18-21 and 27. Rates start at $224, and reservations can be made online using promo code SUMMER.

Sea Crest is also offering packages for Boston residents going to the Cape aboard the seasonal CapeFLYER train. This package includes two train tickets and a $50 food and beverage credit for guests arriving Friday with a Saturday departure, or a $100 food and beverage credit for guests arriving Sunday with a Friday departure for use at Red’s Restaurant and Lounge. Weekend rates start at $400 per night, and midweek rates start at $360 per night. For online reservations, use promo codes FLYERWE (for weekend stays) and FLYWERWD (for midweek stays). For more information or reservations, visit www.seacrestbeachhotel.com or call 508-540-9400.

Related: Cape Cod: the Most Perfect Long-Weekend Getaway

8. Skaneateles, N.Y.

upstate-new-york-vacation

Check out this hidden gem in upstate New York (Photo: Mirbeau Inn Spa)

Northeastern travelers looking to try something new may want to explore the towns and wineries of New York’s Finger Lakes region, about 30 minutes from Syracuse, N.Y. Mirbeau Inn Spa is offering a “ Skaneateles” package for two, which includes overnight accommodations, a bottle of Finger Lakes region wine in your room, and a full breakfast for two at rates starting at $359 per night.

Mirbeau also has a Special Rates for Special Dates deal with midweek room rates starting at $230 per night on Aug. 20, Sept. 1-4, and Sept. 7-11. 

9. Hilton Head Island, S.C.

cheap-hilton-head-hotel

What kind of experience is Sonesta offering? Hint: It’s “the best revenge” (Photo: Sonesta Resort Hilton Head)

Hilton Head is a great place to relax, and Sonesta Resort Hilton Head Island is helping you along with its Art of Living Well Spa Package. The deal includes a massage, facial, pedicure, or reflexology treatment at its Arum Spa, plus overnight accommodations starting at $209 per night. It’s available for travel through Dec. 31, 2014 (Be sure to call Arum Spa in advance to check on availability.). Sonesta is also offering similar packages at its properties in Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., Houston, Miami, New Orleans, and Philadelphia.

10. New York City

cheap-nyc-hotel

The hotel is called “The New Yorker,” but there’s nothing New York about its cheap travel deal (Photo: Ivan Miladinovic/Thinkstock)

End your summer by committing theft in New York City. Wyndham New Yorker Hotel is offering one steal of an end-of-summer deal. It’s offering an Empire Package, with rates starting at a jaw-droppingly low (for Manhattan) $179 per room, per night, based on double occupancy. The package also includes two passes to the nearby Empire State Building Observation Deck. The offer is available through Dec. 29, 2014 on new reservations.

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Aug 19, 2014
Nancy Upton

India’s Rising Tourism Driving Hotel Growth

PHOTO: Located just a mile from the Taj Mahal, the Doubletree by Hilton Agra has fine location. (All photos courtesy those pictured)

Inbound tourism has become an increasingly diverse sector for India. The growth of short-haul markets in Asia, as well as a healthy and growing domestic market, gives India access to travelers who will explore other aspects of the destination as in more sun and fun as well as more pilgrimage travelers coming for important Buddhist and Hindu sites. India is the homeland of the Buddha as well as the land that gave us Hinduism.

Travelers coming from short-haul destinations in Asia will probably change a tourist mix, which now has the U.S. as India’s top market for foreign travelers. About 1.08 million Americans visited India in 2013.

The traditional U.S. approach to traveling in India, which sees the country as an almost exclusively cultural experience and generally combines Delhi, Agra (Taj Mahal) and such Rajasthani destinations as Jaipur and Jodhpur, remains very strong and hotels continue to cluster around these magnets.

Hilton Opens Hotel in Jaipur

Agra and Jaipur remain India’s two most visited attractions. Hilton is now in both locations. The Hilton Jaipur recently opened as the latest Hilton branded hotel in India. This month the 104-room DoubleTree by Hilton Agra, will open less than a mile from the Taj Mahal, and will be one of a very few hotels that actually a view of the site. Located in central Agra, the hotel will also be near such attractions and shopping hubs as Agra Fort, Akbar’s Tomb and Kinari Bazaar.

PHOTO: The Hilton Jaipur is one of Hilton’s newest properties in India.

The Jaipur hotel is well located for access to such attractions as the Hawa Mahal, City Palace and Albert Hall Museum and such shopping and entertainment hubs as Johari and Bapu Bazaar. The hotel has a full variety of restaurants as well as live cooking stations and the Tandoor kitchen at Aurum. The hotel also has an outdoor pool, gym and a 2,400-square foot spa that includes three treatment rooms, and steam and sauna facilities.

Hilton operates hotels and resorts in India under the brands Hilton Hotels Resorts and DoubleTree by Hilton, and the focused-service brands, Hilton Garden Inn and Hampton by Hilton. Hilton operates the New Delhi: Hilton Garden Inn New Delhi/Saket; the Hilton Garden Inn Gurgaon Baani Square and DoubleTree by Hilton Gurgaon-New Delhi NCR; the Hilton Mumbai International Airport; the DoubleTree Suites by Hilton Bangalore; the Hilton Chennai; the Hilton Garden Inn Trivandrum; the Hampton by Hilton Vadodara-Alkapuri; the DoubleTree by Hilton Pune-Chinchwad; the DoubleTree by Hilton Goa-Arpora-Baga and Shillim; and the Hilton Shillim Estate Retreat Spa.

Mövenpick Opening in Kerala

Another popular area for Indian tourism is Kerala and Mövenpick Hotels Resorts is moving into that area as it grows its Indian footprint. The 167-room Mövenpick Hotel Kochi will open later this year, bringing the brand’s Indian portfolio to three properties. It already runs the Mövenpick Hotel Bangalore and is drawing up plans for a spa resort in Dharamshala.

“India has tremendous potential for further growth in the domestic and international travel segments,” said Andreas Mattmüller, Mövenpick’s COO for Middle East and Asia. “Last year, revenues from domestic tourism rose by 5 percent and that figure is expected to increase to 8 percent during 2014. Considering this along with the country’s planned infrastructure developments, we’re keen to continue expanding our existing portfolio in India by including additional key cities.”

PHOTO: The Mövenpick Hotel Kochi will open later this year in the Keralan caital.

The Kochi property lies about four miles from the city center. Kochi is also known as Cochin, the capital of Kerala. Kochi is one of India’s most important seaports and widely regarded as the commercial capital of Kerala, which has seen GDP growth of more than 8 percent during 2013. An Ayurvedic spa will be an important component of the hotel as well as a studio for yoga, reflexology chambers, hammam, whirlpool and salon. Kerala is the home of the Ayurvedic approach to wellness.

Earlier this month the Kerala government committed itself publicly to developing a more modern infrastructure that was sustainable and to improve facilities especially at tourist destinations. The government is planning a 16-acre botanical garden, a big boost for destination weddings.

The Kerala Tourism Department is also planning a 36-room modern guest house in the hill station town of Munnar. Attracting tourists up into the Ghat Mountains will add an entirely new dimension to Kerala, which is primarily visited for its backwaters and historic Cochin (Kochi).

Mövenpick Hotels Resorts entered India in 2011 with the opening of Mövenpick Hotel Bangalore. The company also plans to open Mövenpick Dharamshala Resort Spa, a 124-room resort in the Kangra Valley of northern India in an area with spectacular views of the indigenous forest and Himalayas.

ITC Provides Security for Female Travelers

India was all over the news as it completed the largest election, by voter, in history; an election that delivered a new government and a renewed commitment to tourism. Unfortunately, it also made news for a series of brutal attacks against women.

Even as the government is finally taking more serious steps to protect women so are such tourism stakeholders as ITC Hotels. With some 80 hotels throughout India, the stakes are high indeed for ITC. The chain is accentuating its Eva program, which began back in 2003. The program caters to the needs of the growing numbers of women travelers.

The Eva program features a woman-only Eva floor, staffed and serviced completely by women with special amenities. Even the security on each floor is provided by female guards who will ensure that only the visitors you select are permitted to your room. Lady butlers are present to respond to any request from wrapping a sari, to helping to plan your day, bring morning coffee to your room while you lounge and even provide you with the ITC specialty collection of spa cosmetics from face soaps to makeup foundation.

Aug 18, 2014
Nancy Upton

Yen Zen A Fusion Of 30 Minutes Of Yoga & 30 Minutes Reflexology

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Aug 16, 2014
Nancy Upton

Connecting Alabama: Meet Dennis Nicholson, purveyor of pizza, peace and …

FAIRHOPE, Alabama — When I called Dennis Nicholson, the owner of Papa’s Pizza in downtown Fairhope, the only thing I knew about him was that he’s not so much into resumes. I’d heard he doesn’t particularly care where prospective employees have worked, or for how long. He wants to know how they vibrate.

Huh?

“What does your heart say about the present moment?” he asks everyone who works for him, from the dishwasher to the cooks to the wait staff.

How does one begin to answer that question? How would I answer it?

One thing I soon found out is that he insists that he doesn’t pay people for the tasks they perform. Instead, he pays them to do one thing: breathe.

Which isn’t as easy as it sounds.

“The tough part is being fully present in these four walls,” he said. “And also to become the best ‘me’ I can be for my family and friends, my community, the earth and interstellar space,” he said.

As we set up an interview time, his main prerequisite was that I not have anything to do or anywhere to go, so that I could give him my complete attention. Intrigued, I set the appointment for a Tuesday at 11 a.m., thinking how nice it would be to hang out in Fairhope for a while and chat with this guy.

“Come with questions, and we’ll just free-flow,” he said.

This was going to be interesting.

Lots of love

Papa’s Pizza, on Fairhope Avenue near Section Street, was just opening when I walked in. Ian, a waiter whose long hair was pulled back into a ponytail, warmly greeted me from behind a long counter on one side. Tables line the wall on the other side of the eatery.

Dennis emerged from behind a curtain way in the back and walked, slowly and intentionally, toward me. “Greetings,” he said, offering his hand. His standard salutations are “greetings” for comings and “blessings” for goings. For people he’s especially close to, he might add a “Lots of love, my friend!”

He gestured toward a two-top table in the window along Fairhope Avenue, close to an old upright piano. As we talked, no matter how deep the conversation grew—and it got pretty deep, touching on topics like 9/11, Hitler and the 10 Commandments—he noticed each person who came into the restaurant and often stood to hug them and talk for a moment.

When we first started talking, he asked me to put down my pen. “But… but…,” I thought. At a couple of points, he grabbed my pen and doodled in my notebook.

Dennis is originally from north Alabama, where he and his wife, Rachel, were childhood sweethearts. He took over his father’s window-cleaning business, but after some of his older relatives settled on the Eastern Shore and established the original Papa’s Place in Daphne 26 years ago, eventually Dennis and Rachel found their way here, too.

Dennis’s father and his cousin opened the first Papa’s Pizza in downtown Fairhope in 1993. The tiny eatery had just 300 square feet and pink walls, Dennis said.

“I became friends with everybody in that little pizza shop,” he said. “We fed every kindergartener and first-grader at the K-1 Center for years.”

After opening eight restaurants in the first 10 years of their marriage, Dennis and Rachel left the restaurant business. And that’s when he was introduced to “the world of network marketing,” he said — and it changed his life for good.

“I immediately knew how countries that were starving could be fed,” Dennis said. “I still believe it’s the greatest business model in the world.”

Network marketing, he said, “took me to personal development. It’s the fastest-growing industry in the world right now.” He devoured several books that, he said, “allow individuals to fully grasp and understand the creative power we have at our fingertips.”

The couple moved to the Atlanta area and opened a Zen holistic center in Woodstock, Ga., where they got into yoga, reflexology, neurology, raw foods and meditation. Ten years later, when Dennis’s mother was thinking about retiring, they decided it was time to move back to Fairhope.

Mystic pizza

He told Rachel he would only take over Papa’s Pizza “if it’s a personal development center first,” he said. Nineteen months later, he considers the business to be “a personal development center that serves really good food and sells great local art.”

Employees are referred to as “team members.” “I have a way of working with the team that creates peace,” he said.

While Dennis focuses on the personal development side of the business, Rachel handles day-to-day operations. But, as we continued to talk, it was obvious who was in charge in her absence. He answered questions from team members and walked around talking to customers.

A family came in, and two adorable, suntanned children still dripping from swimming in the bay ran to him, hugged him and called him Mr. Dennis. He sat at the piano bench with them and let them bang on the keys for a while as they giggled. He pulled out a didgeridoo from a basket behind him and blew it.

Yes, a didgeridoo, the wind instrument from Australia. It was almost as long as he is tall.

A prosperous-looking couple who also knew Dennis shook his hand as they left. A man in overalls with a freshly shaved head came in to ask about putting up a sign for a roommate. He got a hug. Two teens at one table had taken a break from working as counselors at Camp Beckwith. It turns out that Dennis had taught them to play piano in three seconds the week before.

At one table, a group from New Orleans was eating at Papa’s Pizza for the first time. Dennis overheard them talking about the menu and trying to decide what to order. He helped them choose two types of pizza, one on each half of a large pie, and then asked the kitchen staff to slice it into 12 pieces instead of eight. As they left, one of the customers stopped to thank Dennis.

“I’m telling everybody in New Orleans about this place!” he enthused. “That was the best pizza I’ve had in a long time.”

Dennis encouraged him to go to the Trip Advisor website and write a review. “We’re No. 2 on Trip Advisor,” he advised me. “This is one of the best restaurants in Fairhope, and I helped build that.”

While we sat, eventually eating a salad and some delicious pasta with Alfredo sauce Rachel had made the day before, a young woman in an off-white dress accompanied by a small group passed by the window, heading into the restaurant.

“Oh, this is the wedding party!” he said, getting up to blow the didgeridoo once again, as if to alert everyone on the street that royalty had arrived.

He disappeared for a while, getting the party of six — the newlywed couple and their parents — set up at the most private table in the restaurant. When he came back, he told me that he had met the groom over the weekend and found out he was getting married at the courthouse. Dennis had invited them to eat lunch afterward at Papa’s — on the house.

Good vibrations

Such kindnesses make him one of Fairhope’s favorite eccentrics. But Dennis said it goes beyond just doing nice things for people.

“Hitting the right string on the piano causes a guitar string to vibrate across the room,” he said. “Our bodies vibrate at a certain frequency.” He tries to keep his vibration the same as that of a tree, he said.

“When it’s in the now, others’ bodies pick up on it subconsciously. That’s why they love me.”

After years spent, as he described it, developing his mental muscle using “simple exercises to keep the brain and body present,” and reading books, he said he’s now working on putting everything he’s learned into a book of his own. He already has a title: “Dennis the Non-Menace: Judge This Book By Its Cover.”

In it, he will teach readers “how to focus on the present moment, what heaven on Earth is, how the brain works and looking at things that balance,” he said.

So why mix peace with pizza? In his pizza joint, Dennis works with his team members on being “in the present moment, in the now.” He also teaches yoga to kids and has done reflexology in the very window where we sat. He claims that he can help improve students’ grades by teaching them how to learn.

“It’s a tool they can take with them the rest of their lives,” he said. “That’s the magic.”

A few quotes from Dennis “the non-menace” Nicholson:

On education: “We’re whole-brain thinkers,” he said, adding that current educational standards teach children “to be factory workers.”

On thoughts: “Whatever the brain focuses on grows.” And “If you’re thinking of another human, there’s a 50 percent chance they thought of you first and you’re receiving it.”

On heaven: “Heaven on Earth is now, in this present moment. “

On the misnomer “terrible twos”: “A child just repeats what it hears in its environment, such as ‘No!’”

On the Golden Rule: “Do unto others—that’s awful! It’s a terrible rule!” Instead, because each person is a combination of the four basic personality types—red, blue, yellow and green—he follows “the rainbow rule”: “Do unto others as they would have you do unto them.”

On playing the piano: “I’ve taught 40 people in the last two months to play piano in three seconds.” So how long has he played? “I don’t play.”

On his mantra: For eight years, Dennis has practiced a 26-word mantra that begins “Love, joy, peace, happiness…” He uses it “to keep in the frequency of now” and “to build the muscle of silence in the brain,” he said.

On stealing: “Nothing is ours to be stolen. When we die, do we have it? The universe took it because we had such a possession of it.”

On books: “Books are like mind candy,” he said. Among his recommendations:

“As a Man Thinketh” by James Allen

“The Science of Getting Rich” by Wallace D. Wattles

“The Master Keys to Success” by Napoleon Hill

“Practicing the Power of Now” by Eckhart Tolle

“Biology of Belief” by Bruce Lipton

“The Power of Your Subconscious Mind” by Joseph Murphy

Aug 15, 2014
Nancy Upton

Browsing for Beauty Services on the Road

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Aug 14, 2014
Nancy Upton

Clark County acts on massage parlors

Clark County has taken an initial step in putting the squeeze on illicit massage businesses.

Commissioners Tuesday unanimously approved an ordinance that will place some new requirements on practitioners of massage therapy and reflexology. The ordinance came in response to concerns about fly-by-night operations that were possibly complicit in providing a venue for illegal sexual activity.

The county’s ordinance requires businesses located within unincorporated Clark County to provide proof that they and their employees are licensed by the state before the county issues a certificate of occupancy. The rules closely follow those recently put in place in the city of Vancouver.

Anne McEnerny-Ogle, a Vancouver city councilwoman who was one of several residents who had asked the county to look into strengthening its regulations, said she was pleased by how the ordinance turned out.

The regulations apply both to massage businesses and reflexologists, a type of therapy that applies pressure to hands and feet. They require all massage therapists and reflexologists be licensed by the state in order to operate in the county. The employees also must have photo identification proving who they are.

“Just because there’s a name on (the license) doesn’t mean it matches the person,” McEnerny-Ogle said.

The issue first arose in the city of Vancouver, where residents of the Shumway neighborhood, including McEnerny-Ogle, raised concerns about massage therapists operating without licenses and the possibility of businesses being used as fronts for human trafficking.

Last year, the city began receiving complaints about some businesses. Vancouver police mounted an investigation and found employees practicing without licenses. Police shut down some of the storefront businesses, while others vanished. The city then tightened its rules.

Jeff Niten, a county planner who worked on the ordinance, said he had talked to a handful of massage businesses and one massage school to notify them of the changes the county planned to implement. Feedback from those businesses was positive, he said, but none responded to the draft ordinance itself.

Thurston County has implemented additional licensing requirements for massage parlors and public bath houses, and Clark County used work done there as a jumping-off point for drafting its own ordinance.

Commissioners strongly supported the efforts, saying they wanted to prevent illicit activity from shaping up on unincorporated land. At the same time, they said such an ordinance should not punish legitimate businesses.

Wary Shumway neighbors have said they’re concerned that illegal massage businesses will take root wherever regulations are lax. Some have been known to disappear, only to pop up under new ownership, making the regulation of their activity difficult.

Commissioner Ed Barnes addressed that concern Tuesday, saying, “These people are pretty smart about moving around.”

Even with tighter restrictions now extending from Vancouver to unincorporated Clark County, there is still work left to be accomplished, McEnerny-Ogle said.

In Vancouver, officials are working with city lobbyist Mark Brown and state Rep. Sharon Wylie, D-Vancouver, to draft potential legislation that would require all licenses for massage therapists and reflexologists to include a photograph of the license holder.

Aug 13, 2014
Nancy Upton

County acts on massage parlors

Clark County has taken an initial step in putting the squeeze on illicit massage businesses.

Commissioners Tuesday unanimously approved an ordinance that will place some new requirements on practitioners of massage therapy and reflexology. The ordinance came in response to concerns about fly-by-night operations that were possibly complicit in providing a venue for illegal sexual activity.

The county’s ordinance requires businesses located within unincorporated Clark County provide proof that they and their employees are licensed by the state before the county issues a certificate of occupancy. The rules closely follow those recently put in place in the city of Vancouver.

Anne McEnerny-Ogle, a Vancouver city councilwoman who was one of several residents who had asked the county look into strengthening its regulations, said she was pleased by how the ordinance turned out.

The regulations apply both to massage businesses and reflexologists, a type of therapy that applies pressure to hands and feet. They require all massage therapists and reflexologists be licensed by the state in order to operate in the county. The employees also must have photo identification proving who they are.

“Just because there’s a name on (the license) doesn’t mean it matches the person,” McEnerny-Ogle said.

The issue first arose in the city of Vancouver, where residents of the Shumway neighborhood, including McEnerny-Ogle, raised concerns about massage therapists operating without licenses and the possibility of businesses being used as fronts for human trafficking.

Last year, the city began receiving complaints about some businesses. Vancouver police mounted an investigation and found employees practicing without licenses. Police shut down some of the storefront businesses, while others vanished. The city then tightened its rules.

Jeff Niten, a county planner who worked on the ordinance, said he had talked to a handful of massage businesses and one massage school to notify them of the changes the county planned to implement. Feedback from those businesses was positive, he said, but none responded to the draft ordinance itself.

Thurston County has implemented additional licensing requirements for massage parlors and public bath houses, and Clark County used work done there as a jumping off point for drafting its own ordinance.

Commissioners strongly supported the efforts, saying they wanted to prevent illicit activity from shaping up on unincorporated land. At the same time, they said such an ordinance should not punish legitimate businesses.

Wary Shumway neighbors have said they’re concerned that illegal massage businesses will take root wherever regulations are lax. Some have been known to disappear, only to pop up under new ownership, making the regulation of their activity difficult.

Commissioner Ed Barnes addressed that concern Tuesday, saying, “These people are pretty smart about moving around.”

Even with tighter restrictions now extending from Vancouver to unincorporated Clark County, there is still work left to be accomplished, McEnerny-Ogle said.

In Vancouver, officials are working with city lobbyist Mark Brown and state Rep. Sharon Wylie, D-Vancouver, to draft potential legislation that would require all licenses for massage therapists and reflexologists to include a photograph of the license holder.

Aug 12, 2014
Nancy Upton

Volunteer therapists wanted – complementary therapy and wellbeing coordinator …

Havens appeals for volunteers to join therapy team

Volunteer therapists wanted – complementary therapy and wellbeing coordinator Lucie Cole with patient Stephen Hughes and his wife, Irene

A VITAL service which helps patients and carers cope with serious illness is expanding – and needs more people to join its dedicated band of volunteers.

Havens Hospices offers free reflexology, aromatherapy and massage as part of its care for patients.

The charity is looking for volunteers to join its complementary therapy team. Complementary therapies are used alongside medical treatment and medicine to help ease the side effects such as nausea, constipation and fatigue, to ease headaches.

Lucie Cole, complementary therapy and wellbeing co-ordinator at Havens Hospices, said: “Complementary therapy gives patients a feeling of wellbeing. We identify the individual’s needs and we then provide support alongside their medical treatment and medication.”

Complementary therapies are offered to patients in the Westcliffbased Fair Havens hospice and also to younger people at Little Havens Children’s Hospice, in Thundersley, their families and carers.

Ms Cole added: “I split my time between Fair Havens and Little Havens. I hold coffee mornings and complementary therapy evenings over at Little Havens, as well as evenings at Fair Havens. It’s nice for the children, as well as their parents, carers and siblings to get special treatment.”

Stephen Hughes, 61, from Southend, was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2011,.

He’d had asthma for years and as his condition worsened it progressed into chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Cancer has also spread to his liver and he has recently started another round of chemotherapy.

He said: “There are a lot of activities I can’t do any more, because of my breathing, but I still work at the hospital, which givesme a bit of normality.

“I’ve had a bad back before and used to have massages at the hospital, but when I was diagnosed with cancer, they weren’t sure whether they could carry on.

“I go to day care at Fair Havens and one of the nurses mentioned I could have a massage, and so could my wife, Irene. I absolutely love it for relaxation and I feel better for a few days afterwards.”

Volunteers need to be qualified in either beauty therapy or individual treatments, such as reflexology, massage or aromatherapy, and be friendly and flexible.

For details, contact the Havens’ volunteer services office, on 01702 426237, or visit havenshospices .org.uk/volunteering

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